When the going gets tough, don’t cancel the Retro

If times are tough on an agile project, whatever you do, don’t cancel the Retrospective meeting.

Let’s be clear, cancelling that meeting is removing an opportunity for the team to inspect the way they have been working, and adapt how they do things so they can improve.

Stop Start Continue

That’s an opinion I’ve held ever since I started working on agile projects back in 2008. It just seems logical to me. I had a conversation this week that reinforced that position.

I was chatting to a couple of members of a development team over lunch about their project.  They couldn’t really stop themselves from complaining about some difficulties their team had been experiencing over the last few months. They highlighted a few issues that they felt could be improved and discussed how they’d like to change aspects of how they work together. My overall observation was – they seemed pretty fed-up.

When I asked if they felt they could discuss these worries in their next sprint retrospective meeting, one of them told me how those meetings had not really helped solve their problems in the past. In any case, their team felt they spent too much time in meetings in general, so they had decided to change their process and only have retrospectives at the end of every other sprint. As a result, they had a retrospective meeting once a month.

I recommended that they have a retrospective as often as possible, given their description of the project. One of the team members stopped me and said, quite matter-of-factly and without a drop of irony, “Some of us, Chris, have a more pragmatic approach”, he shrugged apologetically, “we just prefer action over meetings”.

He looked at me somewhat condescendingly, eyes filled with pity as he considered my misplaced faith in a meeting. How could a group of people coming together to talk about stuff be preferable to actually ‘doing things’?

Somehow I managed to stop myself from slamming my forehead into the table in disbelief. I also avoided making the suggestion that the pragmatist’s preferred action seemed to be complaining about the problems they had, rather than trying to resolve them. I did, however, embark on a robust cross-examination of what was meant by the term “pragmatic”.

My recommendation to the two colleagues (who are good guys, by the way) was to not give up on retrospectives but to talk to their manager/scrummaster/facilitator to see if they can design a meeting together that would help them tackle their problems. And they should definitely have a retrospective every sprint.

I described the kind of retrospective activities that might help surface and explore the issues they were experiencing. A teamwork satisfaction poll, perhaps? Or a Mad/Sad/Glad activity? This seemed to gain some traction with the other team member, who went away to talk to the facilitator earmarked for their next retro.

Teams can label the time they spend in retrospectives as worthless and futile. Often, this is because they’ve experienced some poorly run or structured meetings that have failed to produce valuable, insightful actions. In these cases, I’d plead with a team not to give-up on retros and suggest reading Agile Retrospectives by Derby & Larsen to give their meetings a better chance of success.

Teams have been known to cancel retrospectives if they feel like they are under too much time pressure and are forever racing to reach difficult deadlines. For me, taking time away from your desks to reflect on what is going on when a project feels like it is in a perpetual race against time, is invaluable. To be honest,

So, if you are on a difficult project and are considering cancelling or reducing the frequency of your retrospectives, ask yourself what the root cause of that drive is. Then consider whether that root cause is something that would actually benefit from a regular, frequent opportunity to inspect and adapt.

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